Celebrating #PlasticFreeJuly All Year Long

Over 80% of the plastic in our ocean comes from land. Since the land and sea are interconnected, layered ecosystems, every time we refuse single-use plastic on land we are working to create a clean and healthy environment for generations to come. The Plastic Free July challenge is the perfect opportunity to maximize your commitment to reducing or refusing single-use plastics. Get inspired for the #PlasticFreeJuly challenge with some updates from our grantees below.

A new, excellent resource to help you reach your plastic-free goals is the SHiFT platform, created by ocean advocate and co-founder of eXXpedition, Emily Penn. SHiFT helps you explore ideas that create long term change, from simple consumer choices to more complex industry actions. You can filter through hundreds of solutions and pick the ones that are right for you. Join the SHiFT!Β 

In the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico, and beyond, the Nurdle Patrol is mapping tiny plastic pellets, often called nurdles, with the goal of raising awareness of nurdle pollution to empower change at the state and federal level. To date, a total of 314,167 nurdles removed from the environment by Nurdle Patrollers. If you want to get involved, simply survey your local shorelines and log your data at NurdlePatrol.org.Β 

In Rhode Island, Clean Ocean Access is tackling not only plastic pollution but all marine debris and water quality efforts with the installation of six Marina Trash Skimmers on the East Coast, two of which are located on Aquidneck Island. To date, they have removed 33,325 pounds of trash from the ocean, averaging 112 pounds per day. From July 6-31, Clean Ocean Access is hosting a free Virtual Childrens’ Program for ages 6-12, with weekly lessons about plastic pollution and how it impacts our ocean. Sign up here.

Learn more about our current grantees and the fantastic work they are doing to reduce plastic pollution around the globe.

The 11th Hour Racing Trash Skimmer being emptied by junior sailors at Sail Newport.

The 11th Hour Racing Trash Skimmer being emptied by junior sailors at Sail Newport.

Mission-Aransas Director Jace Tunnell and Nurdle Patrol citizen scientist Sam Sugarek sorting through marine debris by hand. Photo credit: University of Texas

Mission-Aransas Director Jace Tunnell and Nurdle Patrol citizen scientist Sam Sugarek sorting through marine debris by hand. Photo credit: University of Texas

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